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Haiku:

Japanese haiku (and often those in English) are traditionally categorized by the season they suggest. A haiku about snow falling would be a winter poem. One about April showers would be a spring poem. And so forth.

It gets far more elaborate: The Japanese have long lists of words and subjects associated with each season, not all of them intuitive. A broom in a poem might indicate one season, a woman's comb another. In other words, poems that to Western ears suggest no particular season do have seasonal associations for the Japanese.

I haven't tried to adhere to this system. You'll find here MANY categories, with considerable overlap. I simply invented categories on the fly as I sorted out my poems. Where a poem suited more than one category, I included it in more than one.

The haiku mystique is a bit like the wine-tasting mystique -- you know, where you don't drink the wine, you just sip, swirl it around in the mouth, spit it out and say something profound about it being a shy vintage with gentle hints of apricot and sage.

But there's something to it. Haiku are probably best savored, one at a time, read a few times to get the ambiance, not rushed through by the dozen.

But my haiku have no dignity. Do what you will with them. I had fun writing them. I hope you'll have fun browsing or reading or savoring them or even re-writing them.

Spring

Summer

Autumn

Winter

Rain

Wind

Night

Morning

Dusk

Walking

Places

Children

Lovers

Loss and Loneliness and aloneness

Characters

Old Age

Music

A Poet's Life

Cats

Dogs

Beasts

Birds

Insects

Plants

Trees

Telephones and TVs

Things

Mankind